Call us today: London office 08448844696 / Hull office 08448849041 | Follow us online:

Removing faulty brain cells staves off dementia in mice

Researchers say that when they swept away the senescent brain cells in mice, the outwards symptoms of their dementia vanished. The research in mice is the first to show that so-called senescent cells, which enter a state of suspended animation as the body ages, contribute to neurodegeneration. Flushing out these cells was shown to prevent damage, potentially opening a new line of attack against Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

The research in mice is the first to show that so-called senescent cells, which enter a state of suspended animation as the body ages, contribute to neurodegeneration. Flushing out these cells was shown to prevent damage, potentially opening a new line of attack against Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

The researchers describe how mice with a genetic form of dementia accumulated senescent cells in regions of the brain that are involved in memory and cognition, such as the hippocampus. The mice had been genetically engineered to produce a faulty version of the brain protein tau, which was seen to build up in abnormal tangles as the mice lost the ability to learn and remember new information.

However, when the mice were treated by administering a genetically modified enzyme to sweep away senescent cells as they appeared, the outward symptoms of dementia vanished.

For the full story follow the link below.

Dementia in Mice

Back to Posts
Copyright © S3 Science 2018. All rights reserved.